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rad. movement, or migration both within mexico and north tohe u.s. we explore a major and unexpected source of migras caedw re bskf e usionofaquies can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an unintended consequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. ofte those hopes are arrested manyre at the border. man: ahora lista pont la mano en frente... narrator: the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entry with hidden lue: it washe migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseograpr chard jones to the i.n. it washe migrants' home towns with a novel reseah plan. jones knows that ecomic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive ou- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. hehis investigation beginses drily90s- or "push"-- aris home inanoniotes. hehis ijones lieves beginses many secrets are stored in i.n.s. files like tse. can theyeveal where
cementing his position as successor to president hu jintao. he visited the u.s. in early 2012 to promote relations. his counterpart, vice president joe biden, was with him for much of the five-day visit. >> xi showed that on some issues the two governments will not necessarily see eye to eye. >> reporter: xi will likely be joined at the top by the man widely expected to become china's next premier. >> lee became a member of the politburo standing committee in 2007. he skipped the stage of politburo member during the communist party convention along with xi jinping. lee became vice premier in 2008. lee is 57 years old. he hails from a province and is currently in charge of domestic policy. >> li studied law at the prestigious beijing university, where he went on to get a ph.d. in economics. hiss classmate told us li also dedicated himself to studying english. he said the man who will become china's premier show nod sign he would become a politician. >> i think every single day he had a lot of tickets in his pocket. in one side, he write english, another side, chinese together. start out l
caedollow re weskf e usionof s can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an unintendeconsequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. often, those hopes are arrested manyre at the border.o man: ahora lista po la mano frente... narrator the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entrywith hid: it was the migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseograpr richard jones to the i.n. with a novel reseah plan. jones knows that economic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive ou- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. hehis investigation beginses driin tly90s "push"-- aris hom in sanoniotes. jones lieves many secrets are stored in i.n.s. files like tse. can they reveal where most migrants come om? can the answers help both countries keep more ople at home? cjones sampless every tenth record, writing down the area of origin within mexico.
as successor to president hu jintao. he visited the u.s. in early 2012 to promote relations. his counterpart, vice president joe biden, was with him for much of the five-day visit. >> xi showed that on some issues the two governments will not necessarily see eye to eye. xi will likely be joined at the top by li kequiang, the man widely expected to become china's next premier. li became a member of the politburo standing committee in 2007. he skipped the stage of politburo member during the communist party convention along with xi jinping. li became vice premier in 2008. li keqiang is 57 years old. he's currently in charge of domestic economic policy. >> li studied law at the prestigious beijing university, where he went on to get a ph.d. in economics. his classmate told us li also dedicated himself to studying english. he says the man who will become china's premier showed no sign he would become a politician. >> i think every single day he got a lot of tickets in his pocket. in one side, he would write english, another side, chinese together. start out like this. and every day he read this,
, so whether the u.s. down there or italy and spain here in the periphery, 4.7%, 6%, remarkable there, level for spain even today as the country's banks are being more fully examined in light of the national examination plans. the dollar/yen pulling back about half a percent to 8167. let's get to deirdre bolton from singapore. hi, deirdre. >> hi, kelly, how are you? and it's morris, by the way. but i'm flattered that you call me bolton. in china and hong kong, it was all about, what else, the fiscal cliff. those comments from the senate majority leader harry reid overnight really sparked some jitters in this session today, so we have red across the board. the shanghai composite, it is well and truly below that 2011 level, shedding another .9 of a percent. the hang seng was feeling some of that pressure from chinese stocks and shedding .6 of a percent. it was the mainland banks that were the culprit. they didn't fare as badly if the mainland. some capital requirement rules are going to be implemented that are raising concerns about loans and the ability of these major banks to give out
a little bit and to talk just for a moment about the u.s. competitiveness and the u.s. economy in a global context. and their actually was an oecd report that came out this morning that does that admirably. this report predicts that within four years, by 2016, the chinese economy will be bigger than the economy. and what the oecd report sort of further says, it's a great report. if you're interested, take a look online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases
here. the u.s. allegatielections and redskins lost. >> we will mention the redskins indicator, but it's true whether the u.s., china, greece, eurozone itself would make for a big week, but combine them all together, in fact it's no wonder that markets are a little unnerved. >> coming up today, plenty to get through. we're at singapore where hundyui shares are down. >> and here in london, uk pmi data will be out. the question whether it will follow an upward trend. >> and china preparing for the once in a decade political handover. we'll take a lower look at the new leadership. >> when the redskins win or lose, it has predicted the top winner since 1980. there has been a notable expossession of 1984. >> although gore did win the popular vote but not the electoral college. >> in 2000. >> that's right. >> the all-important football -- i should say american football indicator here. it points towards a romney victory. >> besides all that, plenty corporate news. hsbcs has set aside an additional $800 million in the third quarter to deal with the u.s. anti-money laundering probe. that brings
of their force projection in the persian gulf into that conflict. i think there is hope that the u.s.-israel relationship is strong and open enough and the lines of communication are open up that it would not happen. one of the other things that if it may give a little positivity towards that is a concern that the nuclear facilities are so far in the ground that israel does not producing a satisfactory assault. they would need u.s. plant emissions to carry some of those weapons. perhaps that might give some hope there would be communication, if there is an attack down the line, that the two countries would be to work together and cordray. host: 3 more, go to foreignpolicy.com. thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you for having me. host: that does it for today. we will be back live tomorrow morning but lawmakers make their way back for the lame-duck session that begins today. we will be up there taking your calls and your comments and questions. thank you for watching today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satel
government which still considers the plant a dangerous drug? as the most expensive election in u.s. history comes to a close, we will talk about the issue facing more and more americans that rarely got a mention in the presidential campaign -- poverty. >> the problem is, obama himself no better than romney is still very much part of a system that has failed poor and working people. capitalism is not working for poor and working people in america. we have to bear witness to that. >> we will speak what dr. cornel west and pbs host tavis smiley. together they have written, "the rich and the rest of us: a poverty manifesto." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in chicago. the pentagon has confirmed that iran fired at a pilotless u.s. drone last week, but missed its target. pentagon spokesperson george little insisted the incident occurred in international, not iranian, airspace, and vowed that u.s. surveillance flights will continue. >> the incident occurred over international waters approximate
chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you.Ñsr >> next, the interim america dialogue discusses the results of the november 6th elections and implications for latin america. panelists discuss the prospects for change with the obama add enrings' policies involving immigration, trade, drug policy, and economic cooperation. this is about an hour and ten minutes. >> this morning, we're going to have a conversation, a discussion, about the elections, november 6th elections in the united states, and what the results mean for u.s. relations and latin america, and the idea really is to have a good exchange and to engage everybody here to talk about what the significance of the outcome might be. we're going to start with the few opening remarks, and then invite, encourage you to share your insights about what the elections might mean. i'm joined this morning by three of my colleagues from the inter-american dialogue, peter hakim, the president emeritus and sen
on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico released one of the worst oil spills in u.s. history. the obama administration announced is putting a temporary stop on new federal contracts with bp. for more on the financial impact, i spoke with adam brooks. and what does this actually need for bp? >> it means they still have not been forgiven for the explosion in the deep water rights in that killed 11 people and pumped millions of gallons of oil into the gulf of mexico in 2010. it means that in addition to $4.5 billion in fines that they have agreed to pay, a leading criminal charges, bp will now not -- pleading guilty to criminal charges, bp will now not in -- get any new business in the u.s. >> how much business does vp actually have with the u.s. government at the moment? >> most people point to its contract that it has today, $1.4 billion in fuel that it sold to the u.s. last year. bp employs 23,000 people here and has billions of dollars in investments. it was hinting that it was not in america's interest to allow bp's business here to go under. another important thing, they have new dri
clear yesterday that he is open to new ideas. the u.s. cannot afford tax cuts that were passed 10 years ago -- over 10 years ago now. he feels that the most fair way to pick our revenue shortfall is by raising revenue from the very top. >> explained to everyone, if you can. under balsams and, it was predicted that we have -- bowl es-simpson, it was predicted that we would have 16 trillion dollars. even if you have that, why is that ok to have 22 trillion dollars of debt at in 10 years? by the is that considered still a good thing to do? -- why is that considered still a good thing to do it? >> the best capacity is the size of the debt relative to the economy. what the president has proposed is to put us on a path where the debt is stabilized and we are coming down relative to gdp. >> it is still 100% of gdp. >> i would explain a little bit about the numbers. that is the 16 trillion dollar figure that you mentioned earlier. i do nothing that is inappropriate way of measuring our debt. it is not the measure of that that is economic relevant. >> ten or 12? >> closer to 12. >> ok. the unemp
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
is president and ceo of the windstream corporation, he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> just ahead, a series of discussions by the world affairs council of america exploring national security issues facing the u.s. up first, former national security adviser steven hadley. he talks about the economic impact on national security. then a panel of former ambassadors discusses relations between the u.s. and pakistan. after that former middle east envoy dennis ross talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiativ
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
history of debt in the u.s.; and h.i.v. infections in young people. but first, the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street lost ground today over renewed concerns that deficit talks in washington are not making progress. the dow jones industrial average was down 89 points to close at 12,878. the nasdaq fell nine points to close below 2968. earlier, there were more signs of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i thin
part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that supports democratic pro-choice women for all kinds of offices around the country. they are very powerful and have been working really hard for a long time to get more women effect did. other celebration about the creator of the woman, sometimes you want to say this is terrific progress in other times you say wow, 20%. but it's very, very work getting women elected. so i cited emily's list because they're the bigge
charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communi party andhe military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us
and caused the worst offshore oil spill in u.s. history. the payment includes $4 billion related to criminal charges, including $1.2 billion in criminal fines, as well as half a billion dollars in payments to securities regulators. attorney general eric holder said thursday the settlement broke two records. >> bp has agreed to plead guilty to all 14 criminal charges, including responsibility for the deaths of 11 people and the events that led to an unprecedented environmental catastrophe. the company has also agreed to pay $4 billion in fines and penalties. this marks both the largest single criminal fine, more than $1.25 billion, and the largest total criminal resolution, $4 billion, in the history of the united states. a >> critics say even their record numbers reflected in the settlement represent just a fraction of bp's profits and will not be enough to deter future disasters. public citizen called a settlement that the attic and a slap on the wrist, noting the deal did not prevent bp from continuing to receive lucrative government contracts and leases. under the settlement, bp agreed to
. unbelievable. where should you put your money to work? you say this not here at home, it is by the u.s. >> mention a couple of stocks, disney and apple. no reason to pick through the rubble. the s&p 500 stocks are fairly priced. look at the u.s. as a whole, are looking to eke out 2.5% gdp. if you look at the emerging market for the last year and a half they have significantly underperformed the s&p 500, valuation is cheaper than the s&p 500 and if you look at a place like india, that is investors dream. the median age over 25 compared to 37, 38 for the u.s. growth rate coming in around 7% over there, the emerging middle class going from 100 million to 600 million by 2025. just investing in $2 billion in united spirits, that is a consumer you want to tap into, plenty of opportunity for long-term growth, much cheaper multiple than what you are finding on the shore. david: ticker symbols, epi, and china broad-based. it is great to see you. very good advice, thank you very much. >> thank you both. sandra: would have a top strategist that says the gold craze is on the way and the best way t
- door hearings about the september 11 attack that the u.s. consulate in libya. then the senate armed services committee confirmation hearings to lead u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan. then a national security adviser previews the upcoming trip of the president 2000 -- southeast asia. former federal reserve chairman alan greenspan and paul volcker are part of a forum on the so- called fiscal cliff, the impending budget cuts and tax increases that start in january unless congress reaches a deal. we bring that to you live, starting 8:15 on c-span 2. the house and senate intelligence committee held meetings looking into the libya. -- the attacks in libya. acting cia director and the intelligence directorate among witnesses. next we hear from house select intelligence committee ranking member, diane feinstein and the vice chairman. this is 20 minutes. accent? i think what is important about the hearing is the fact that members of the intelligence committee were able to get a lot of facts. i think what really occurred as far as benghazi was concerned, we went through a timeline. we went
and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what kind of leverage does the u.s. have? >> president obama has pledged $1 billion in aid to the egyptian government. that money is incredibly important to the egyptians. their economy has been faltering. in addition, the egyptian military receives almost $1.3 billion per year from the united states. in addition, the egyptian government is looking for support from other actors, like the international monattorney fund and the european union. so all of that-- the money that the egyptian government needs, the u.s. leverage to try to get the egyptians to bring peace to to conflict. >> brennan: juan zarate, thank you. >> thank you. >> brennan: in egypt today, at least 49 children were killed when a train smashed into a school bus. 1190 miles sowpght of cairo. the force of the crash broke the bus in half, and the destruction made it difficult to count and identify bodies. the man in charge of closing the gates at the crossing has been arrested. authorities say he was sleeping when the bus crossed the tracks. two oil workers remain lost at sea
. i will tell you here and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. >> we called it a calling. >> a calling, exactly. >> exactly. word of honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the affect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is
former cia director petraeus. the current commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan, his name is john john allen, is now being investigated. he is accused of sending, or being involved with thousands of e-mails with jill kelley. she is the florida socialite who led the fbi to petraeus. steve handelsman is on capitol hill with more on this. >> thanks. good evening from capitol hill. coincidentally, general kelley is not in afghanistan tonight. he came here to washington for a hearing that was to be held tomorrow. it has been put off, day after tomorrow on, what allen still hope will be his promotion to a better job. instead, his reputation is being called into question. general john allen, u.s. commander in afghanistan, was on track to be nato commander until the disclosure that he is under investigation by the pentagon. jill kelley, a socialite in tampa and general allen allegedly exchanged e-mails and documents that were called inappropriate. allen insisted there was no affair. kelley's complaints that she was getting harassing e-mails led the fbi to paula broadwell and the affair between
the changes could mean. >>> welcome back. take a look at the u.s. equity futures. dow and s&p coming off their worst week since july 4th. you can see they are indicated higher, but maybe not the bounce you might have expected. the dow up 23. >> squawk sports new, texans beating the bears 13-6. foster finished with 102 yards rush and touchdown catch and texans intercepted cutler twice before knocking him out with a concussion. >> no comment about the jets? >> they lost. >> andrew, here's the deal. >> did you see rex ryan -- >> the giants won the super bowl last year. a lot of people have told him he's fat and he should shut up. he's not fat anymore. she just shut up. but sanchez, you brush up against him and the ball goes flying out. >> they've been going back and forth. >> when the giants are the defending the super bowl champions and they got their butts kicked by the bengals and the other game unbelievable is johnny football. texas a and m and alabama, that was unbelievable. alabama number one. texas a and m just joined the sec. and this guy johnny football, you just can't believe the
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the price in the form of lost economic growth and development, stifled innovation and social progress and diminished opportunity. so i will describe those threats and talk about what needs to happen for us to keep the global internet on the right path. to harness the opportunities new communications, technologies to benefit all. there's a lot that about the relationship between communications technologies and world events, but in some important ways the relationship between the mutations, technology and world history has always been a profound one. the printing press was a new communications technology that changed the world. it won't take us back that far, but for a few minutes i will take us back 50 years to a powerfully important speech given by an fcc chairman in 1961. that made president john f. kennedy's. , newton minnow, spoke to the national association of broadcasting. his speech generally remembered for the declaration that tv had become a vast wasteland. but the speech, and i recommend reading it was ac
such a thing as a fiscal cliff like you have in the u.s. the old budget simply takes over up a new budget has been agreed on. so there is no financing disaster in the middle of it. the curious crux to this is if this old budget takes over because of the in-build qui sooif inflation factor in there, it's actually than the new budget they're debating right now, so all the countries pushing for the cut and even putting the threat on the veto on the table, they will actually chief the opposite. we'll keep on spending more even then with a sort of slide budget increase that the eu commission put on the table. and as to where the negotiations stand, i think at the moment the budget talks, pardon to be cynical, but political posturing on the various side than the actual effects in there. because if you look at the mound that the various countries put up into the budget, i think like 9 billion and that is already one of the biggest, we just save banks and sovereigns for hundreds of billions of bailout funds. so in terms of the actual money, this is absolute small cheese. >> absolutely is. silvia, for
knew from the start the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya was terrorism. that's according to lawmakers who heard his testimony today on capitol hill. we'll have to take their word because the hearings were closed to the public. one republican congressman saying he said government officials changed the c.i.a. talking points about the attack to remove any mention of al-qaeda. >> talking points were drafted with specifically about al-qaeda affiliates, they didn't have it in front of them and they said that was did she it had to go through the process. it seemed unclear. that was taken out. >> earlier on studio b, a democrat, at the same hearing, says general petraeus also told them officials made the changes to protect classified information. >> they didn't want to be specific as to the precise group they thought was responsible or groups because there may have been multiple groups involved, multiple groups of terrorists or extremists. but it was done to prospect classified information and he was very clear this was never done for political purpose. this wasn't manipulated by
do to itself if washington allows us to go over the fiscal cliff. unemployment in the u.s. which has come down to to 20.9%, it could go up another 9%. according to a new research new york post poll, you clearly understand the danger of this fiscal cliff. 50% say it will have a major effect on the economy, 21% say a minor effect, 2% no effect, 10% say they don't know, which is why you're watching this right now. president obama says they're centering around increasing tax on the wealthy which will go a good way in increasing the revenue that he wants to raise in the next decade in an attempt to reduce the federal deficit. he wants to reinstate the bush tax cut which goes to the top 2% of earners. that would jump from 36% to 39%. he likes to say that's where it was during the clinton years. the second one would go from 36% to 39%. he's been focusing on this specific number since his reelection which suggests he may compromise on the actual rates in order to get a deal. there are other taxes as well he's talking about. taxes on investment gain would also go up. the capital gains tax wou
in the gaza strip after more deadly attacks. >> a busy day on the hill as lawmakers demand answers on the u.s. consulate in libya. >>> welcome to news 4. a live look outside right now at 5:00 a.m. 43 degrees out there. safe to say keep out the winter coats. no more shoving them in the back of the closet. >> look outside. don't go out there. it is another cold morning. make sure you wear your warmest winter coat. a lot of cloudiness. here's the view from space. cloud cover drifting over the region coming from the south. a disturbance in the carolinas giving us this cloud cover. we're not going to get any precipitation from it. right near freezing much of virginia, maryland. it's still cold, feeling like a december morning. prince gorgeous, my-30s. much of southern maryland, calvert, st. mary's, a rundell, mostly above 40. prince william county, into the shenandoah valley, a few isolated spots there. a little bit below freezing. when the sky is cleared out, western maryland, west virginia, it's into the upper 20s there. a lot of cloudiness. light wind. cold morning. near 50 by midafternoon. sun
to studies, the average household could pay $3500 more in taxes. unemployment in the u.s. which has come down to 7.9% could head back up above 9% by this time next year. the u.s. could join europe which has been hit by a double dip recession. and according to a pugh research/"washington post" poll, you clearly understand the danger of this fiscal cliff. 68% say it will have a major effect on the economy. 21% say just a minor infect. only 2% say no effect. 10% say they don't know which is why you're watching this right now. president obama's solution to all this is to make a deal centered around increasing taxes on the wealthy which will go a good part of the way to raising the $1.6 trillion in new revenue that he wants to raise over the next decade in his attempt to reduce the federal deficit. he wants to let the bush era tax cuts expire. if that happens, the top tax rate on income would jump from 36% to 39%. he likes to say that's where it was during the clinton years. the second top rate would go from 33% to 36%. now this is what president obama campaigned on. he's been vague about the spec
messages. last year, you have a press release that said the u.s. has not seen any spillover violence. saying that when we are acknowledging that our law enforcement has been engaged in a gun battle. we have had people killed. narcotics have been caught. that is what is competing this. we need to recognize it for what it is. transnational criminal organizations -- we cannot pursue them across the international border. we will put what ever it takes to defend the sovereignty -- >> he made a point that there was a bill to fund more border patrol agents. i think it is well-known that republicans in washington do not like to spend a lot of money. his comments were that members of your own party do not want to fund this initiative. >> people are tired of blaming parties. >> that is exactly what i just said. [laughter] before you did that, you blamed republicans. [talking over each other] >> i acknowledge that president bush and president obama have increased the number of border patrol. i acknowledge that we have an increase of resources. when you have a disparity of resources in other sta
to equip the new immigrants with the skills they need to make it in the u.s.. for example as richard mentioned by making sure that they and their children receive effective english language instruction. we tend to talk a lot about what to do about illegal immigrants who are already here whether to provide them with what some people call the legalization and other people call amnesty and on both sides lot of the arguments or moral. one group suggesting legalization would erode the rule will fall and another saying it's the status quo that undermines the rule of law and decides that he man to lead to a humanitarian duty to regulate the status of the people who come here over the last few decades. well, my own reading of the polls is that the answer is that people give to a lot of questions depend a lot on the wording of the question which suggests to me the polls are useful for identifying some impulses that are strong in the public and not so much for finding specific policies. the impression i have is that most people are not opposing the principal to allowing people who've been here
: it is a busy news morning. the u.s. is officially getting involved in the mideast fighting. secretary of state hillary clinton is en route to meet with prime minister benjamin netanyahu as the u.s. embassy attacked this morning. we have leland on the ground. we'll go to washington with the latest details on secretary clinton's mission. >> good morning. israel and terrorist leaders of gaza exchange fire president obama is dispatching secretary clinton to the middle east it is a hastedly arranged departure from cambodia where she is involved in the ongoing summit. she plans to visit israel and ramallah and egypt because u.s. considers hamas a terrorist consideration and prohibits contact it is relying on egypt and turk yeqatar to deliver its message to the hamas leadership. >> on the trip secretary clinton will emphasize the united states interest in a peaceful out come that protects and enhances israel's security and outcome to lead to improved relations to the civilians in gaza and reopen the path for israelies and palestinians so they can live in peace and security. >> some doubt secretary cl
and length of time in the u.s., you may be eligible for federal benefit programs and it goes through a long lit any and it is long and a lot of money. >> it is unfortunate. immigrants are treasures the arrival of each one makes us more american because it signifies. >> if they are here to work. >> absolutely. it is it the last thing you want to do is offer them hand out to come here. that insures that you get a lower quality person coming here. we want to attract those who want to come here and achieve. >> steve, that is it the problem. i would say the overwhelming number of immigrants come here to work there are some that is drawn like in europe. offering the benefits. and they came just for the benefits. >> yeah, unfortunately john is right. most immigrants want to get ahead as lincoln put it and improve your on lot in life. this is about the citizenry and occupiants of the country, they want to subvert us and make us independent and that means votes for the center. we see what is happening in europe with they do that. >> rick, we have a list of all of those aliens that qualify. lawfully
volunteer work in the u.s. and around the world. this was recorded in fairfax virginia and is about 20 minutes. >> host: "the voluntourist" is a book by ken budd. what is it about? >> guest: this is a way to do it if you can take two years to join the peace corps. postmark when did you start voluntary? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have
was back on capitol hill today testifying about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. as emmy schmidt reports, lawmakers want answers about what he knew about the attack that killed four americans, including a u.s. ambassador. >> various scenarios. >> reporter: david petraeus ended a week in the spotlight behind closed congressional doors. >> general petraeus's briefing was comprehensive. >> reporter: the attack in libya has become a political issue over when the obama administration knew what prompted the attack. spontaneous reaction to an anti- muslim video or terrorists. now, impressions of the meeting are mixed. >> so much of this confusion arises because of the difference between what is classified and what is unclassified. >> he told us that this was a terrorist attack, that there were terrorists involved there the start. i told him i had a very different recollection of that. >> reporter: he said petraeus testified he had no direct contact in developing the talking points used by susan rice. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. pointed to the film as a potential cause. >> th
difficult to deal with? why is the u.s. a decade into the war unable to go on patrol with afghans? >> one of the reasons is geographical. if you look at this relief map here, the border between afgh afghanistan and pakistan is very artificial. i've crossed the border many times. every time illegally. and the mountains that descend from the high table land of central asia to the steamy in this river valley, it's a very gradual descent. it's the same indough-islamic civilization on both sides of the border. so the sides that the u.s. military and diplomatic core is going to make two separate well functioning states out of it is somewhat adverse to geology. >> what's really going on, we tlinch are good guys and bad guys but there are guys the pakistans supports, the guys that india has sup pored, the russia has intended -- >> india is a big player here, fareed. because if you look through indian history from the guptas to the mull rans, the moguls, the dynasty, others, what you see is for many periods of indian history or sub continent history, the same empire that controlled the northern th
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